Frequently Asked Questions

These FAQs are designed to shed light on some of the more common questions we receive from clients. Answers to other question may be found elsewhere on the site using the Search function above. If you don’t find the answer to your query, feel free to contact us directly for more help.

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  • 1. Should I include Short Breaks when entering Work Times?
     

    It has come to our attention that organisations have been including short breaks (45 mins) when inputting work hours into FAID for analysis. For example, an eleven hour shift, is broken into blocks of 4 / 2 / 1.5 / 1.25 hours of work with 45 minute breaks in between. Thus, the individual has been inputted to have only worked 8.75 hours, and subsequently a lower Peak Fatigue Score is produced, than if they had been inputted as a whole eleven hour shift.

    Overall, the inclusion of breaks that are less than 1 hour is not sufficient to include as an opportunity for an individual to obtain recovery sleep.

    If there is adequate surroundings provided by the organisation for an individual to rest; e.g. a quiet, dark room, with sleeping facilities, and a long enough break is provided for the purpose of rest, then it may be appropriate to split a shift into work, short-break, work periods.

    In the case of no adequate opportunity for sleep provided, then it is recommended, by the Centre for Sleep Research, that at a minimum a rest period of four hours should be included in inputs when entering work periods.

    If the organisation is splitting up the shifts into separate tasks, where there is an allocated Low Risk time of less than 1 hour, then the inclusion of a Low Risk shift would be more appropriate for Risk Management than a short break of non-work.

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  • 2. What does FAID stand for?
     

    FAID is the Fatigue Assessment Tool by InterDynamics. It is not an Acronym.

    If you are wishing to reference FAID, please either simply refer to it as "FAID", or "FAID - Fatigue Assessment Tool by InterDynamics".

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  • 3. What happened to FaidSafe as a brand?
     

    In the past InterDynamics utilised the brand ‘FaidSafe’ to refer to it’s Fatigue Risk Management services and methodology.

    Nowadays we are proud to refer to this offering as Our Risk-Based Approach to managing fatigue. The company is the same – we’re just simplifying our branding and focusing more on who we are – InterDynamics.

    You may also have noticed that InterDynamics’ various websites (including www.faidsafe.com) have been consolidated, in order to showcase our full capabilities within the one re-designed site.

    We hope you like the new site and find all the information you need about our Fatigue Risk Management and Decision Support offerings.

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  • 4. I typed in faidsafe.com and ended up here – is this right?
     

    Yes you’ve come to the right place!

    InterDynamics’ various websites (including www.faidsafe.com) have been consolidated, in order to showcase our full capabilities within the one re-designed site.

    We hope you like the new site and find all the information you need about our Fatigue Risk Management and Decision Support offerings.

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  • 5. Why is FAID helpful in managing fatigue?

     

    FAID is definitely helpful in identifying fatigue exposure associated with hours of work whether these are planned or actual hours, and in particular, taking into account time of day impacts on sleep opportunity and recovery provided by different work patterns. It is also very useful in understanding what is currently being tolerated by the hours worked with regards to fatigue exposure (by analysing 12 months or more of historical data). When combined with a risk management approach it is a powerful analysis tool.

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  • 6. Why would Fatigue Tolerance Levels (FTLs) be set at different levels?
     

    The Fatigue Tolerance Level (FTL) is a benchmark FAID Score figure, that is used in the resulting outputs. Hence, analysis results are measured against this benchmark using colours:

    FAID Condition Colours

    If we say that the FTL is the FAID Score associated with a fatigue exposure that one is willing to tolerate, and consequently would plan schedules to within this benchmark, then we could plan hours of work for higher risk tasks against a lower FAID Score benchmark (FTL) then a lower risk task where one would likely tolerate higher fatigue exposure.
    Hence, when using multiple FTLs a higher FAID Score benchmark figure is chosen for a lower risk task, as the fatigue exposure tolerated could be higher.

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  • 7. How is commuting considered within FAID?
     

    InterDynamics' scientific advisor (and from whose thesis FAID came out of) Dr Adam Fletcher has indicated the following:

    The subjects in the studies that were done when FAID was developed worked in a range of operations with various commute times as occurs in most companies and industries. On average, the commutes were 30-45mins each way. This time period is not a separate inclusion within FAID, but rather reflects the living conditions/situation of the people involved in the scientific research project. Thus long commutes have come to be defined as those longer than 45mins.

    Around 30mins each way in terms of FAID, has come to be considered 'normal' and anything significantly over 30-45mins is likely to mean FAID is underestimating the impairment and overestimating the recovery sleep. The resolution is not so high however that we should get caught up about 5 or 10 mins in commute time when we know other factors (such as how boring/monotonous the drive is, the time of day of the commutes and the conditions) all play a role as well.

    Where significantly longer commutes exist at the start or end of shifts, then the shift start/end time can be extended to account for the extra time above (say) 45 minutes, to review the impact on fatigue exposure as a result of the longer commutes.

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  • 8. What is a Fatigue Tolerance Level (FTL)?
     

    A Fatigue Tolerance Level is a benchmark figure, set and rostered against in a biomathematical model as an Hours of Work related control.

    While the FAID Score is essentially arbitrary, benchmarking studies suggest that fatigue threshold scores of 80 or below are consistent with a safe system of work for Australian industrial operations.

    In the absence of a Fatigue Hazard Analysis Risk Assessment Workshop, a Peak Fatigue Threshold score of 80 can be used as a starting point.

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  • 9. What are FAID Scores?
     

    FAID provides a representative score (FAID Score) of the fatigue exposure of a worker based on the following biological determinants of fatigue:

    • The time of day of work and breaks
    • The duration of work and breaks
    • The work history over the last seven days (this is weighted so that the most recent days provide the most input)
    • The biological limits on recovery of sleep (basically, this acknowledges that you can’t bank up sleep. That is, there is only a certain amount of sleep that can be obtained in a break of certain duration at a certain time of day.)

    While the FAID Score is essentially arbitrary, benchmarking studies suggest that fatigue threshold scores of 80 or below are consistent with a safe system of work for Australian industrial operations.

    In the absence of a Fatigue Hazard Analysis Risk Assessment Workshop, a Peak Fatigue Threshold score of 80 can be used as a starting point.

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  • 10. How does FAID work?
     

    FAID makes provision for the user to enter and compare results of multiple ID’s (representing either individuals, groups, or shift patterns) across two work schedules (sometimes used to compare Planned and Actual data). Results for Hours worked when exceeding the set Fatigue Tolerance Level (FTL), Peak FAID Scores, and more, are determined and presented both graphically and in tabular form, together with summary distribution of results.

    Fatigue Scores over time

    Plot showing FAID fatigue scores over time

    Shift Details

    Shift Details

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  • 11. How do you import data into FAID?
     

    There are three methods of inputting of shift data into FAID:

    1. Direct input via either the Single or Cycle Add Shift function within FAID
    2. By selecting Shifts from the Add Shift function within FAID that have been pre-defined shift from within the Settings section
    3. Creating the shift patterns in a spreadsheet and then copying and pasting into FAID.

    Within the FAID Work Schedules (1 or 2), there is one task/shift/rostered activity record per line containing three compulsory fields of information (ID#, Start, End), and an optional fourth field (Task Risk) if Task Risk ratings are turned on within the Settings section of FAID:

    ID# is a number used to identify an employee or planned sequence of shifts (“line of work”).

    Start and End are the date and time of the task – FAID writes these in “dd mmm yyyy hhmm” format but is quite versatile in interpreting (reading) most common date/time formats.

    Task Risk (if using multiple FTL’s) must be one of “Low”, “Moderate”, or “High”

    For example:

    1,1 Nov 2007 0900,1 Nov 2007 1730,Moderate

    1,2 Nov 2007 0900,2 Nov 2007 1730,Low

    Additional Information can be found in the following FAQs

    Note: The FAID Roster Tool (which also allows for the application of roster templates), FAID BW, FAID TZ and Customised versions of FAID Standard can also directly import shift data extracted from third party systems.

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  • 12. I need some advice on classifying the risk.
     

    For assessing the risks in your operations there is an Australian/New Zealand Risk Management Standard AS/NZS ISO 31000:2009 that provides a comprehensive guide to risk management. It includes a qualitative risk analysis matrix and uses a combination of the magnitude of the consequence and the likelihood of the event, which are allocated a qualitative measure of high risk, moderate risk and low risk.

    Support in this process is also available through our Fatigue Hazard Analysis Risk Assessment workshops.

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  • 13. What is fatigue related risk analysis?
     

    The magnitude of consequences of an event, should it occur, and the likelihood of the event and its associated consequences, are assessed in the context of the existing controls. Consequences and likelihood may be determined using statistical analysis and calculations. Alternatively, where no past data is available, subjective estimates may be made which reflect an individual's or group's degree of belief that a particular event or outcome will occur.

    To avoid subjective biases the best available information sources and techniques should be used when analysing consequences and likelihood.

    Types of analysis

    Because of the complexity and cost of analysis, in practice, qualitative analysis is often used to obtain a general indication of the level of risk. Later it may be necessary to undertake more specific quantitative analysis.

    The methodology InterDynamics employs is based on the Zurich Hazard Analysis developed by Zurich Risk Engineering. It is similar to, and supportive of the framework provided by the Australian/New Zealand ISO standard for Risk management – Principles and guidelines (AS/NZS ISO 31000:2009).

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  • 14. What are fatigue risk ratings?
     

    Within the Settings of FAID, task risk ratings may be turned on and used with multiple Fatigue Tolerance Levels (FTLs). This feature would be used if an organisation wished to select different risk ratings for different tasks / shifts of the same individuals, or analyse multiple roles of differing risk ratings at the same time against varying FTL’s together within a single company-wide Hours of Work Work Schedule. In practice however, most organisations usually analyse single job functions as a discrete unit, or have a single FTL for the whole organisation, and thus rarely use the multiple FTL / task risk ratings.

    When turned on, a fourth column of data appears in the Work Schedule for the task risk rating. There are three fixed ratings:

    1. Low
    2. Moderate
    3. High

    These relate to the task that is being performed. For example:

    • a pilot is in command of take-off or landing – High
    • a pilot is in the office doing photocopying – Low
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  • 15. Why manage fatigue risks?
     

    With an increasing corporate recognition of the risks involved with roster related fatigue and the public awareness of the impact of these risks, there is a need to proactively address the problem of fatigue inducing work practices.

    Fatigue and its impact on decision making is a global issue that has emerged with the extended hours of work required to service 24/7 operations. Work-related fatigue and consequent changes in alertness, reaction time, decision making and communication are all major risks for shift workers.

    Fatigue risk management is a shared responsibility. Employers have a duty-of-care to provide safe work schedules that permit an adequate amount of time for an employee to sleep, rest and recover from a shift.

    Just as importantly, workers have a duty-of-care to their employers and fellow workers to ensure that they obtain sufficient sleep and rest in order to complete their work duties in a safe and responsible manner.

    Work-related fatigue and consequent changes in alertness, reaction time, decision making and communication have all been identified as major risks for shift workers. Our Risk-Based Approach is designed to help manage these risks and contribute to a safer work place.

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  • 16. What is risk management?
     

    Risk management is recognised as an integral part of good management practice. To be most effective, risk management should become part of an organisation's culture. It should be integrated into the organisation's philosophy, practices and business plans rather than be viewed or practiced as a separate program. When this is achieved, risk management becomes the business of everyone in the organisation.

    Risk management is the term applied to a logical and systematic method of establishing the context, identifying, analysing, evaluating, treating, monitoring and communicating risk associated with any activity, function or process in a way that will enable organisations to minimise losses and maximise opportunities.

    Risk management is as much about identifying opportunities as avoiding or mitigating losses.

    The methodology InterDynamics employs is based on the Zurich Hazard Analysis developed by Zurich Risk Engineering. It is similar to, and supportive of the framework provided by the Australian/New Zealand ISO standard for Risk management – Principles and guidelines (AS/NZS ISO 31000:2009).

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  • 17. What if my computer doesn't have a Windows operating system?
     
    • Operating System: Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8 or Windows 10.
    • Free Hard Drive Space required is a minimum of 10MB
    • Free RAM requirements are a minimum of 64MB, preferably 512MB and possibly 1GB+ if analysing 1000+ individuals and/or 12 months of data.
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  • 18. Can FAID be run within Citrix or App-V environments
     

    FAID is a stand-alone and well behaved MS Windows application which works well within common virtualization environments. While we don't have specific data on server versions we do have several clients successfully using FAID within both Citrix XenApp and Microsoft App-V environments.

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  • 19. Can I analyse more than 3 weeks of hours of work data using FAID?

     

    The free trial version of FAID is limited to 3 weeks of analysis only. FAID 330 allows 3 months of data, and 1-30 ID#s to be analysed, whereas FAID Standard has no limitations.

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  • 20. When saving a file, FAID informs me that it is unable to save the file and displays the filename with a file extension of .$$$?
     

    This means that either the file is currently in use by another program, or that the folder, for the destination of the file, has write protection (i.e. read only) applied to it.

    To fix for the file in use:

    Close the file in use, and
    Then try to save the FAID file.

    To fix for the Write Protected folder:

    Navigate (ie using windows explorer) to the folder where saving to
    Right click – select "Properties"
    Unselect the Read Only attribute.

    To fix for the Write Protected folder for Windows Vista:

    From the Program Start Menu find the FAID program icon
    Right click – select "Properties"
    Under the "Compatibility" tab tick "Run this program as an administrator"

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  • 21. What are the minimum computer requirements for running FAID on my computer?
     
    • Operating System: Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7 or Windows 8
    • Free Hard Drive Space required is a minimum of 10MB
    • Free RAM requirements are a minimum of 64MB, preferably 512MB and possibly 1GB+ if analysing 1000+ individuals and/or 12 months of data.
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  • 22. What format is your data file?
     

    FAID uses comma delimited text files with an ‘.rtr’ (Roster Task Risk) file extension. RTR files have no header information.

    There is one task/shift/rostered activity record per line containing three compulsory fields of information (ID#, Start, End), and an optional fourth field (Task Risk) if Task Risk ratings are turned on within the Settings section of FAID:

    ID# is a number used to identify an employee or planned sequence of shifts (“line of work”).

    Start and End are the date and time of the task – FAID writes these in “dd mmm yyyy hhmm” format but is quite versatile in interpreting (reading) most common date/time formats.

    Task Risk (if using multiple FTL’s) must be one of “Low”, “Moderate”, or “High”

    For example:

    1,1 Nov 2013 0900,1 Nov 2013 1730,Moderate

    1,2 Nov 2013 0900,2 Nov 2013 1730,Low

     

    View a sample .rtr file

    Sample Work Schedule 2013 (4.3 KiB)

    Additional information on generating this data using Microsoft Excel can be found in the I am having trouble entering and manipulating data for importing, what do you recommend? FAQ.

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  • 23. Why can’t I see the first week of my data in the FAID outputs?
     

    It is important to remember that the fatigue calculation requires a week of history to determine a FAID Score. Therefore if you wish to analyse a week of rostered activity, data from two weeks must be supplied. The first week will be used as history for the beginning of the week to be analysed and no results for the first week will be provided.

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  • 24. I am having trouble entering and manipulating data for importing, what do you recommend?
     

    Spreadsheets are a good way to assemble a lot of data and provide the ability to manipulate shifts. Below is an example of how to use the ‘Quick Roster’ spreadsheet.

    Quick Roster for FAID (26.5 KiB)

    Utilising some additional columns (Day, Shift Length, Time To Next Shift [Days, Time]) you can enter one date and time in the first Start shift, and the rest of the required FAID columns of data (ID#, Start, End) can be calculated ready for copying and pasting back into FAID using pre-developed formulas.

    QuickRoster_Calculations

    1. To start, enter the first Start date and time (example: E5).
    2. For the shift (row) enter the Shift Length (HH:MM) and Time To Next Shift (Days and/or Time).
    3. Next, the cell containing the End date will have the calculation:
      = Start cell + corresponding Shift Length.
      ( F5 = +E5 + H5 )
    4. Then, the following Start Date will have the calculation:
      = previous End Time To Next Shift [ Days ] and [ Time ]
      ( E6 = +F5 +J5 +K5 )
    5. Go back to Step 2., and repeat for as many shifts necessary.
    6. When finished, copy to the clipboard the data under the highlighted FAID data columns (ID#, Start, End)

    QuickRoster_DataforFAID

     

    1. Then, return to FAID and in Inputs – Work Schedule 1 (or 2) click the paste from clipboard button.

    You now have the ability to manipulate a roster by changing the Shift Length and Time to Next Shift data on the spreadsheet.

    Download the spreadsheet -

    Quick Roster for FAID (26.5 KiB)

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